Building Midori on Ubuntu 8.04

Here are the steps I took to install Midori on my Ubuntu 8.04 workstation.

1. Install WebKit

The first thing you need to do is install webkit:

Here are the dependencies for webkit:

sudo apt-get install libicu-dev libxslt1-dev libcurl4-openssl-dev \
libsqlite3-dev libjpeg62-dev libpng12-dev gperf bison flex \
libgtksourceview2.0-dev git-core build-essential \
libgstreamer-plugins-base0.10-dev libgstreamer0.10-dev \
libgnome-vfsmm-2.6-dev automake1.9 librsvg2-dev librsvg2-bin

Now get the latest webkit source code:

git clone git://git.webkit.org/WebKit.git WebKit

(this takes a while so you may want to look into other options here.)

Now we build WebKit:

cd WebKit
./autogen.sh --prefix=/usr --enable-video
make

The make step takes a while, but after it finishes, try launching the test app, and assuming it launches successfully, go ahead and install everything:

Programs/GtkLauncher
sudo make install

And there you go, WebKit is now installed!

2. Build and Install Midori

Our next set of tasks is to install Midori.

First grab the latest packages:

cd ~/src
git clone git://git.xfce.org/kalikiana/midori

Now let’s compile:

cd midori
./waf configure
./waf build
sudo ./waf install

Midori should now appear under Applications > Internet

Launch it and away you go:

The Midori Browser passes the Acid3 Test

The Midori Browser passes the Acid3 Test

One thing I should point out is that you should not expect Midori to be a full browser. It isn’t. At least, it is not a full browser yet. Some things are missing and/or not fully implemented. One of these is Bookmarks. They work after a fashion, but the bookmark code is incomplete and partially broken. This is a very early version (as of this writing) and things will improve, but it will take a while. Midori, for now, is just alpha quality — good for demos, but not much else. You cannot use it as your primary browser, yet.